Murray Hill

35 E 38th St 1D New York, NY 10016

New Patients:
Phone: 646-722-1108


Brooklyn

441 Clinton St. Brooklyn, NY 11231

New Patients:
Phone: 718-625-2929


E Harlem

1667 Lexington Ave. New York, NY 10029

New Patients:
Phone: 212-289-4131


Midtown

136 E 57th St. #1604 New York, NY 10022

New Patients:
Phone: 212-752-8181

10 Signs You Need To See A Dentist

Your teeth are an essential component of day-to-day life — so as soon as something feels a little off, that’s your cue to get a professional opinion. Whether you visit the dentist bi-annually, annually, or whenever you feel like it, there are oral concerns that can pop up regardless. Now, some of the things we’re about to mention are a lot less common for those who maintain regular hygiene visits, however, it’s important that everyone has a pulse on what to look out for. 

 

Here are our 10 signs you need to see a dentist… 

 

Pain or Swelling 

It is completely normal for your mouth to feel a little irritated at times, however, persistent pain or swelling is certainly an area of concern. If your teeth or gums have been sore or swollen for a noticeable amount of time, this could be a sign of infection and we encourage you to schedule a dental visit for an oral exam. 

 

Gum Changes 

Your gums can tell a lot about your overall oral health too. If you have noticed that they are puffy or inflamed, swollen, changing in color, are beginning to recede – or have a persistent odor, it is a prime time to visit the dentist. This could be a sign of gum disease, which should be ruled out as soon as possible to preserve the longevity of your teeth, gums and jaw bone. 

 

White Spots 

If you have started to see white spots pop up on your teeth, this could be an indicator of tooth decay. If caught soon enough, it is possible to stop that decay from leading to greater damage such as cavities. 

 

Problems With Past Dental Work 

For those of you who are living with crowns, fillings or implants, there is always a risk of running into a problem down the line. While the materials used to fix your teeth are designed to be sturdy, it is not uncommon to experience a problem with everything we chew on a daily basis. 

 

Color Or Texture Changes 

If you noticed a rash or bumps pop up on your skin, you would get a doctor’s opinion, right? – the same goes for your mouth! If you notice that the texture of your mouth is changing or there is a noticeable change in color (such as red patches) this is a quick indicator to schedule a dental appointment to address the concern. 

 

Increased Sensitivity 

If you have noticed a sudden change in your sensitivity to hot and cold foods, this could be an indicator of tooth decay. For others, increased tooth sensitivity could be a result of grinding your teeth – which is why getting a professional opinion is essential. If you have a cavity, the dentist can patch that right up, whereas if you have a grinding or clenching problem, they can send you home with a custom night guard. 

 

Persistent Bad Breath 

If you have a bad breath that just won’t go away, this is a sign to call in the professionals. For those of you who are brushing and flossing two times a day, yet the foul smell still lingers – this could be a sign that something more serious is going on. Oftentimes, getting that deep clean from the dentist (and potentially some restorative work) is all that is needed to make that unwanted smell go away for good. 

 

Difficulty Chewing 

Plain and simple, if you are having difficulty chewing or swallowing it is time to get into a dentist asap – be sure to only consume liquids until that appointment too! 

 

Jaw Pain 

If your bite feels a little off, or you notice popping sounds when you chew, this can be more than just annoying – it can be a serious problem, especially if you’re experiencing pain too. 

 

Lingering Sores 

Everyone gets those pesky mouth sores from time to time — but if they aren’t going away on their own after a week or two, this is a sign to get the opinion of your dentist. Depending on the severity, these sores can be traced to infection or virus that requires your attention.  

 

Added on: December 7, 2022
Posted In: Oral Health