Murray Hill

35 E 38th St 1D New York, NY 10016

New Patients:
Phone: 646-722-1108


Brooklyn

441 Clinton St. Brooklyn, NY 11231

New Patients:
Phone: 718-625-2929


E Harlem

1667 Lexington Ave. New York, NY 10029

New Patients:
Phone: 212-289-4131


Midtown

136 E 57th St. #1604 New York, NY 10022

New Patients:
Phone: 212-752-8181

Do I Really Need To Floss Every Day?

For some reason, flossing is one of those habits that can be hard to maintain. While there are individuals who pride themselves on flossing every day, there are some who keep it up occasionally and others who choose not to floss at all. We all have habits of our own, but one thing you can count on is the dentist asking “do you floss every day?” at your next dental exam. 

 

Now, you may not floss as much as you should and still walk out of the dentist cavity free – but consider yourself lucky. Let’s just cut to the chase. Yes, flossing every day, preferably two times a day is important, and here is why… 

 

Floss Can Reach Places That Your Toothbrush Can’t.

It’s important to know, about 40% of your tooth’s surface can only be cleaned with floss. While brushing is great, that only covers the other 60%. As you eat throughout the day, food particles can easily become lodged between your teeth – the longer those pieces of food linger there, the more at risk your teeth become. Over time, these particles turn to bacteria, resulting in bad breath, decay and even gum disease.   

 

Flossing Prevents Gum Disease. 

As mentioned above, when your mouth isn’t properly taken care of you become more at risk for gum disease or periodontal disease. Gum disease can lead to tooth loss and even deterioration of your jaw bone. Reducing the amount of bacteria in your mouth is the best way to avoid this – which is best achieved through flossing! 

 

Flossing Prevents Serious Disease. 

Your mouth is responsible for more than you may realize, that is why keeping it as clean as possible is essential to good health. The more plaque you keep around, the more susceptible you are to life threatening diseases including heart disease and rheumatoid arthritis. 

 

Flossing Reduces Cavities. 

This may be an obvious one, but it’s important to mention! Yes, flossing reduces cavities as you may have already guessed. Simply put, as bacteria is left in the mouth it turns into an acid that eats away at your tooth enamel. Since the job of tooth enamel is to protect your teeth like a shield, your teeth are left weak and at risk once that enamel is gone – resulting in cavities. 

 

Fortunately, there are ample tools available nowadays that make flossing easier than ever before. If you’re not a fan of traditional floss, there are floss picks, water picks and more! We know that adding this extra step to your tooth routine can sound like a drag, but believe us – it will go a long way in the health of your smile! 

 

 

Added on: November 30, 2022